Wednesday, July 18, 2018

DZYAN – Electric Silence (Bacillus Rec. – BAC 2033 Ⓩ Quadro/Stereo/LP-1974-ST)




Label: Bacillus Records – BAC 2033
Format: Vinyl, LP, Album, Quadro/Stereo / Country:Germany / Released: 1974
Style: Krautrock, Jazz-Rock, Experimental
Recorded and remixed at Dierks Studios, Stommeln, Germany, October 1974.
Design, Painting [Front Cover] – Helmut Wenske
Photography By – Dieter Weis
Engineer – Toby Robinson
Producer – Peter Hauke
Written-By – Marron, Giger, Karwatky
℗ 1974 Bellaphon Records
Manufactured and distributed by Bellaphon Germany
Matrix / Runout (Side A, runout stamped): BAC 2033 SST - BLPS 19218-A
Matrix / Runout (Side B, runout stamped): BAC 2033 SST - BLPS-19218-B-2

A1 - Back To Where We Come ............................................................................. 9:00
A2 - A Day In My Life ............................................................................................ 4:05
A3 - The Road Not Taken ..................................................................................... 5:00
B1 - Khali .............................................................................................................. 5:01
B2 - For Earthly Thinking ...................................................................................... 9:38
B3 - Electric Silence ............................................................................................. 4:40

Musicians:
Eddy Marron – guitars [acoustic, 6/12-string], sitar, baglama [zaz], tambura, mellotron, vocals
Reinhard Karwatky – electric bass, double bass, strings [super string synth.], mellotron
Peter Giger – drums, percussion

Note:
Rolf Gehlhaar (Feedback Studio, Cologne) played something called the Super String.
[Rolf Gehlhaar is incorrectly credited as Rolf Gehlhar on the cover.]
Bassist Reinhard Karwatky and drummer Peter Giger joined on quest as well.
Karwatky doubled on synthesizers and this 'Super String', an undefined electronic device invented by a protégé of Karlheinz Stockhausen. Giger added an assortment of ethnic tablas, steel drums, and tuned African woodblocks to his percussion arsenal, and was even allowed a brief, accompanied solo (with himself) in "For Earthly Thinking".


With Electric Silence, Dzyan develops the ethnic-based fusion trend that had been so thoroughly insilled in the amazing predecessor Time Machine: this line of work meets in Electric Silence its ultimate expression, as well as the last stance (sadly). One thing is clear, the trio is more robust than ever, feeling more secure individually and collectivelly to expand the sonic pallet they had been working on so far. The attentive listener can notice traces of similarity to Annexus Quam, Gila, Malesh- era Agitation Free, as well as the most exotic vibes of Yeti-era Amon Düül II. The opener gest started in a very chaotic fashion, creating a psychedelically driven restlessness based on the ad libitum aglomeration of tuned percussions, guitar and synth effects. Not being oppressive, it certainly is turbulent. While the ensemble goes gradually forming a more ordained sonic structure, things turn into a mixture of tribal atmospheres and free-jazz improvisations - all this lands into an exercise on jazz- rock with funky undertones. The marimba fade-out briefly hints at the starting point, in this way ending the track in a full circle. As the fade-out wanes, the massive shades of Arabic colors in 'A Day in My Life' give way to the sitar and tambora to indulge in a fabulous, expansive dialogue, craftilly yet subtly augmented by the contrabass. It's eas yto tell that the spirit is one of celebration, but the joy is somehow constrained. 'The Road Not Taken' is also focused on exotic tonalities and ambiences, only this time the instrumentation is mostly electric: the soaring, partially constructed moods set nuances that stand halfway between the dreamy and the mysterious. The climatic frenzy shared by the contrabass and the drumkit in order to encapsulate the minimalistic guitar phrases brings fire to the air...



The album's second half starts with 'Khali', yet another piece inspired by the colors and moods of India and the Middle East: the presence of mellotron and guitar layers adds a clear spacey edge to the whole exotic atmosphere. 'For Earthly Thinking' elaborates a musical journey that is very weird, although not shocking or obtuse. The rhythm pattern is quite catchy, full of candid pulsations; the synth adornments emulate some sort of tropical percussion; the alternation between the zaz and the lead guitar are mostly aimed at the enhancement of the rhythmic pace; the bass lines get particularly impressive at some point, and there is also a very impressive drum solo; the chaos emerging for the last section bears a strange appeal. Dzyan seems to have built the perfect bridge between Agitation Free and early 70s Weather Report. Only a few times will the listener find this level of performative refinement in the krautrock area. Perhaps I would have preferred a louder inception of sonic display for the climax, but nothing can really keep me from regarding this piece as a definite highlight. The album's last 4 ½ minutes provide a moment of relaxed meditation set on a slow, jazz-driven tempo: it's not a soft piece really, but it is clearly designed to evoke images of mental relaxation. "Electric Silence" is a must for all krautrock collectors, as well as modern fusion lovers and psychedelic rock freaks. Dzyan shines brightly among other jazz-friendly krautrock acts such as Gila, Annexus Quam, Ibliss.
(I dedicate this review to my PA friend Sinkadotentree).

Review by Cesar Inca / Prog Reviewer



If you find it, buy this album!

5 comments:

  1. DZYAN – Electric Silence (LP-1974)
    Vinyl Rip/FLAC-96kHz+Artwork (320 MB)

    1fichier:
    https://1fichier.com/?2b8g5r1q2p1lokg1gl56

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  2. Nice to see you back. I think this third and last album, is also the best from Dzyan. Thanks!

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  3. Hi Vitko,
    one of the worst album covers I'd ever seen, but the music is quite nice. Great rip, as always.

    Meanwhile I'd downloaded a couple of your very early CD posts and enjoyed a lot of your free improvisation stuff. I discovered an awful lot of fantastic music, which I'd never heard before. Thanks for keeping these old files alive.

    Hope you had some nice holidays. Best wishes from summerly warm Germany.

    Uwe

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    Replies
    1. It's always nice to hear a few words from an old friend. I'm going to stay on prog music for some time, then switch back to jazz, I have great things. Every good, Uwe. Enjoy music.
      V

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