Tuesday, June 2, 2015

MUHAL RICHARD ABRAMS – Things To Come From Those Now Gone (LP-1975)




Label: Delmark Records – DS-430
Format: Vinyl, LP, Album / Country: US / Released: 1975
Style: Free Jazz
Recorded October 10 & 11, 1972 at P.S. Studios, Chicago.
Artwork By [Cover] – Graphica Studios, Chicago
Design [Cover], Photography By [Cover] – Earl McGhee
Producer, Supervised By – Robert G. Koester
Recorded By – Paul Serrano

A1 - Ballad For New Souls ................................................................ 4:32
A2 - Things To Come From Those Now Gone ................................. 4:03
A3 - How Are You? ........................................................................... 4:33
A4 - In Retrospect ............................................................................. 3:41
A5 - Ballad For Lost Souls ................................................................ 5:50
B1 - 1 And 4 Plus 2 And 7 ................................................................. 9:58
B2 - March Of The Transients ........................................................... 6:09

Muhal Richard Abrams – piano, composed
Edwin Daugherty – alto/tenor saxophone (tracks: A2, B2)
Richard Brown – tenor saxophone (track: A4)
Wallace McMillan – flute, alto saxophone (tracks: A1, A2, B2)
Emanuel Cranshaw – vibraphone (tracks: A3, A5)
Reggie Willis – bass (tracks: A2, B2)
Rufus Reid – bass (tracks: A3, A4, A5)
Steve McCall – drums, percussion (tracks: A2, B1)
Wilbur Campbell – drums, percussion (tracks: A2, B2)
Ella Jackson – vocal (track: A3)

I have often found the work of Muhal Richard Abrams uneven. The best of it floors me and some of it goes right by, but it is almost always engaging and the musical intelligence and integrity involved are impeccable. Things to Come From Those Now Gone has a lot of variety, from the opening duo between Abrams' piano and Edwin Daugherty's flute to a couple of high-energy quintet killers. Abrams' impressionistic side is in evidence on a few tracks, and it's this aspect of his music I have grown to appreciate over the years. The differing styles and approaches balance each other convincingly, but overall, this one ranks with Abrams' best.


Pianist Muhal Richard Abrams will forever be remembered as a cofounder of Chicago's venerated Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians (AACM). While his leadership in the organization is admirable (he was president almost continuously from 1965 to 1977), Abrams was a musical innovator as well. Things to Come from Those Now Gone was his third album for Delmark.  It’s the last to be reissued by the label and remains one of Abrams most eclectic offerings. As if in deference to his position as educator the gathering of players on hand for the date is largely made up of AACM students. Abrams makes use of the musicians’ blossoming talents in a broad variety of harmonic and melodic ways. Featuring the talents of reedist Richard Brown, bassist Rufus Reid, drummer Steve McCall, and others, the album is extremely varied, featuring different combinations of instruments on each of the seven tracks. Abrams and company often dwell on elegiac musings rooted in the blues, early jazz, and gospel, but there is also some ferocious free jazz interplay at times. The pianist's playing is often contemplative, filled with open spaces and spare chords; when he does pick up the pace, though, Abrams produces material that fits nicely into the great bop-colored traditions in much the same way the Art Ensemble of Chicago's music does. Undoubtedly a sign of how fresh this album sounded when it was originally released, the music here is timeless. 
_ by Tad Hendrickson


50 Years of AACM - Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians



If you find it, buy this album!

15 comments:

  1. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. New link:

      MUHAL RICHARD ABRAMS – Things To Come From Those Now Gone (LP-1975)
      Vinyl Rip/FLAC+Cover

      1fichier:
      https://1fichier.com/?6vqfsaw3ay

      Delete
  2. thanks for this Abrams I've not.

    ReplyDelete
  3. thank you very much

    ReplyDelete
  4. Thank you so much for all these wonderful AACM related vinyls. Great rips and amazing sound quality. Uwe from Germany

    ReplyDelete
  5. My copy of jRiver on my PC shows this at 98khz/16 bit (a sampling rate hitherto unknown to me). Was this intended? For reasons unclear to me, my other copy of JRiver - an earlier version - attached to my hifi, won't play the file at all. Not entirely sure what the problem is.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's all right, for Free Losless Audio Codec (FLAC) is used:
      Default Sample Rate (from 192kHz to 44kHz).
      Default Sample Format (16, 24 or 32 bits).
      I made something between, although typically 96kHz, but there I am ... eh ... never mind...

      I send to you a new FLAC link, the one to which you are accustomed, with 44kHz:

      https://1fichier.com/?zph0j6ee16

      Now, I hope, everything's okay :)
      Enjoy! This is a really great album.

      Delete
  6. Many thanks. That works a treat. I'm happy with files up to 192khz, it's just that 98khz is not a recognised sampling rate for most software/hardware. I suspect that the reason the previous versiont played on the my PC and not my hi-fi laptop is that on the former everything is up sampled to 192, whereas the latter retains the original. In principle, I'm all for higher bitrates, but they do produce much larger files and in practice, 96/24 is about as high as you need to go when ripping from vinyl.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Thanks for another great LP.

    For reference, despite what Niel Young may think, 48khz/24 bit really is enough for listening to music (in a recording studio things are different.) Using higher resolution can make it sound worse!

    This excellent video explains and demonstrates the issues if anyone is interested:

    https://xiph.org/video/vid2.shtml

    ReplyDelete
  8. Hey, this looks like it's great but the links are down... Think you could re-up the album? Thanks for all the great albums!

    ReplyDelete