Tuesday, January 26, 2016

MAL WALDRON TRIO – Tokyo Bound (LP-1970)




Label: Victor ‎– SMJX-10089
Format: Vinyl, LP, Album, Gatefold sleeve / Country: Japan / Released: 1970
Style: Modal, Free Improvisation
Recorded in Tokyo, Japan on February 7 & 12, 1970.
Design – Teruo Hanzawa
Photography By – Naoki Mukouda, Takashi Arihara
Manufactured By – Victor Company Of Japan, LTD. – SVIR-10045

A1 - Japanese Island ...................................................................... 10:34
A2 - Rock One for Jimbo San ......................................................... 13:01
B1 - Atomic Energy ........................................................................... 8:50
B2 - Mount Fujiyama ....................................................................... 12:41

All compositions by Mal Waldron

Personnel:
Mal Waldron — piano
Yasuo Arakawa — bass
Takeshi Inomata — drums


Tokyo Bound is a studio album by American jazz pianist Mal Waldron recorded in Tokyo in 1970 and released on the Japanese RCA Victor label.



In early 1970 American pianist, already residing in Europe for some time, on the basis of his released album has been invited to visit Japan (by local Swing Journal company). On his first ever Japanese tour Mal spent two days (February 7 & 12) in studio in Tokyo where recorded some material.

Four songs, recorded by trio with domestic double bassist Yasuo Arakawa and drummer Takeshi Inomata were soon after released as "Tokyo Bound" album. Eight compositions, recorded solo, has been released later same year as "Tokyo Reverie". Both albums didn't attract lot of attention but opened for Mal Japanese scene. He returned for next Japanese tour already next year and very soon became well known and popular pianist on Japanese mainstream scene...

Enjoy!


If you find it, buy this album!

14 comments:

  1. MAL WALDRON – Tokyo Bound (LP-1970)
    Vinyl Rip/FLAC+Artwork

    1fichier:
    https://1fichier.com/?5ylpcbnbbz

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  2. Arigatōgozaimasu, Vitko - your "room" is like a lucky bag...! :)

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    Replies
    1. Douitashimashite, Lucky San.

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    2. Rhaa !!! Génial, milions thanks'.

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  3. Love Mal Waldrons music, ever since the first release of ECMs Free At Last from 1969. Tokyo Bound is one I'd never heard. It will be a very nice evening. Thank you so much, dear Vitko for another great share.

    Uwe

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  4. Thanks a lot for this one from Mal, Vitko, never heard it before. Nice! Just one question....are you experimenting with different bit rates and sample rates? The Larry Young album 'Unity' I downloaded the other day was 24 bit at 44khz, and this set is reading as 16 bit at 96khz on foobar! Plays fine, but I was just curious! Thanks again....

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    Replies
    1. Hi JD,

      of course it sounds good. This is somewhat unusual combination that I learned from my friends with Radio Corona. In fact, if you have an old and quite damaged vinyl, after ripping put it in the process of separation, cleaning, lifting the level of sound and a new conversion. Then back to the multitracks, and create surround mixes. I need to mix and master a whole album, at the highest possible depths (this is always the way I work, I try to keep the material at the highest resolution possible for as long as possible). The crackle and crunch that stays (that which is impossible to remove without major deformation and distortion) with 16 bits at 96kHz less is heard and it is not so annoying than with 24-bit / 44.1kHz or 24-bit / 96kHz, and dynamic range is very good. Usual 16 bits at 44.1kHz gives slightly worse results.

      So say my ears :)

      This album which is in front of you, has a better sound of my vinyl record.

      So, I recommend this, I think it would be interesting and you too to try 16/96 and 24/44.1, and then maybe 20/48 or something...

      Cheers.

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    2. Indeed. The sound is amazing. Have you ever tried to work with Izotope RX Advanced or Adobe Audition? In some cases the software is really helpful.

      Uwe

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    3. I was not trying, Uwe,
      all I'm working on a couple of programs that I bought on the recommendation of my friends from the Radio who are professionally engaged in this business. Something that can not do at home, or I do not know, I work with them in the Studio.
      Many years ago, initial lessons on the processing of sound I had on "Sound Forge".

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  5. I came across a rip of this some years ago, and I really like the record. It will interesting to hear your remastering of this. Thanks again for all you do Vitko.

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  6. Thanks for the sound upgrade vitko. I'm anxious to find out if these aging ears can detect the difference.

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