Sunday, January 26, 2014

P. DUNMALL / P. ROGERS / K. NORTON – Go Forth Duck (2004) and Rylickolum: For Your Pleasure (2003)



Label: CIMP – CIMP 296
Format: CD, Album; Country: US - Released: 2004
Style: Free Jazz, Free Improvisation
Recorded at The Spirit Room, Rossie, NY, May 20, 2003.
Spirit Room Series, Vol. 175
Artwork By [Cover] – Kara D. Rusch
Engineer [Recording] – Marc D. Rusch
Producer – Robert D. Rusch

While the production appears rushed, the music is of the caliber that is to be expected from musicians such as Paul Dunmall, Paul Rogers, and Kevin Norton. The recording comes from the same session that produced the superb Rylickolum: For Your Pleasure but curiously, the notes for this one refer only to tracks from that earlier release, and Kevin Norton is listed as playing drums but not vibes, which he also performs in splendid fashion throughout. There are only three pieces, with two ("Go Forth Duck" and "I Am Not a Van [Ofocals]") of considerable length. Dunmall is a master of the small group performance: he paces each track carefully so that there is a relaxed sense of completeness. Dunmall plays his three favorite horns -- the soprano sax, bagpipes, and tenor sax -- and along with Norton's vibes and drums, plus Rogers' bass, there are a total of six instruments, making this more diverse and accessible than the usual sax-led trio album. In terms of Dunmall's discography, this is a quality set, equal to the reedist's best work. There is the requisite intensity, with Dunmall blowing hard when appropriate; there are also sections of introspective beauty. His magnificent solo on soprano following Norton's hardcore drumming near the end of "Go Forth Duck" shows why Dunmall is so respected as an improviser. Through the course of this solo alone, Dunmall springs off the bass and drums, develops moods, morphs in sometimes subtle ways, and engages in unmitigated flash, ending with a prime display of technical bravura with galloping clusters. His bagpipe reaches a majestic height as he merges sounds with Rogers' acoustic bass on "Come Back Weirdness Day." Rogers and Norton are about as tight a rhythm section as exists. They each know how to spur a soloist and they are each excellent soloists themselves. This is a power trio at the peak of their game, and here they project some wonderful moments.

_ STEVEN LOEWY, Rovi




Label: CIMP – CIMP 289
Format: CD, Album; Country: US - Released: 2003
Style: Free Jazz, Free Improvisation
Recorded at The Spirit Room, Rossie, NY, May 19, 2003.
Artwork By [Cover] – Kara D. Rusch
Engineer [Recording] – Marc D. Rusch
Producer – Robert D. Rusch

NOTE:
The A.L.L. bass was designed by Antoine Leducq; it has a wide fretboard with 2 tiers of strings: 6 or 7 traditional-like bass strings on top and 12 or 14 sitar-like sympathetic strings running under the length of the fingerboard and just above the body of the bass.

REVIEW:
Saxophonist Paul Dunmall and bassist Paul Rogers share a longtime association playing European improvised music. With Keith Tippett and Tony Levin they complete the quartet known as Mujician. Dunmall also plays with singer Richard Thompson. With guitarist Phillip Gibb, Rogers and Dunmall comprise Moksha. With percussionist Ken Norton, an Anthony Braxton alumnus, they form a long-travelled trio that took time out here to document intimate empathy and free imagination.

The title track begins portentiously with struck chimes, Rogers softly grinding on bass, and Dunmall playing coy melodies. They quickly blossom into Norton and Rogers providing the clickety clack for Dunmall’s hard driving train. His powerful soprano runs itself out, Norton lets the bass drive for a while, and Norton switches to chilly vibes. Dunmall picks it back up, then rests while Rogers pulls rapid elastic bass and Norton offers light cymbal brush work. He gets crazy in the upper register and Dunmall returns to give chase. Norton adds more drums to the attack, adding thrust to the momentum, all three full force. As the rush dissipates, Norton returns to vibes and Dunmall confines himself to toneless breath, Rogers popping harmonics. Norton plays mysterioso vibes, with occasional drum splash.

The performance continues with “ Villaka, ” and Norton solos in stellar bursts on vibes. He continues creating spontaneous fire, and Dunmall joins him with a tenor full of gasoline. They make having a lot of ideas sound easy. Norton transitions to drums and Rogers returns with his aggressive fluency. The trio rocks hard, then Dunmall lingers over phrases, changing his purrs into barks, finally pops and squeaks coloring strenuous bass runnings from Rogers. Norton whizzes on brushes, switches to sticks, finally to vibes for Rogers’s high scratchings that drop low and Dunmall off again with Norton at his heels still on vibes. Going back to sticks on drums, he whips Dunmall into an inspired exchange.

After their retreat, “ Indokeluka ” begins with Rogers ’ continued soft scrape. Norton contributes tentative vibes and Dunmall a slow soulful melody. Rogers ’ itchy bowing infects Dunmall, who turns melodies in on themselves, finally disolving down to Rogers as the center. Dunmall breaks loose again with Norton casting rhythm nets under his feet, and Rogers continues his bowed meditation. With Norton back on atmospheric vibes, Dunmall rolls quick little phrases around; but as Rogers turns up the intensity, Dunmall gets raw. He slurs and overblows in duet with Rogers, Norton takes an uncluttered solo, and Rogers brings Dunmall back with him. Norton and Rogers take on a swinging rhythm and Dunmall plays all over it. With Norton blazing back on vibes, Rogers and Dunmall offer small comments.

As always, the recording boasts that patented CIMP sound: clear, clean, and refreshing. The unadulterated acoustics gives up every nuance and tone the trio can imagine.

_ By REX BUTTERS, Published: June 1, 2004



Links in Comments!

7 comments:

  1. P. DUNMALL / P. ROGERS / K. NORTON – Go Forth Duck (2004)
    MP3@320+Artwork

    DepositFiles:
    http://dfiles.eu/files/pm6sg3hmo



    DUNMALL / ROGERS / NORTON – Rylickolum: For Your Pleasure (2003)
    MP3@320+Cover

    DepositFiles:
    http://dfiles.eu/files/0wwfw0x4i

    ReplyDelete
  2. Many thanks, Vitko! Two new (for me) CIMPs with Paul Dunmall! Really gift for me!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Hey Vitko . . . Dunmall is new to me so thanks! Appreciate the listen.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Paul Dunmall is always amazing . One of my favourite saxophone players . Thank you very much Vitko.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Thanks from a Paul Rogers fan!

    ReplyDelete
  6. Una maravilla ambos discos, Paul Dunmall es uno de los mejores saxofonistas del free.

    ReplyDelete